Main

January 18, 2010

Goal Setting for the Procrastinator

According to various studies, somewhere between 40 and 80 percent of American adults make New Year’s resolutions. Some resolve to eat healthier, exercise more, make more money, spend more time with family, do more to help others, find a better job, quit smoking or another bad habit, find “the one,” and go back to school.

Despite all the best intentions, few people achieve their lofty goals. In fact, some studies suggest that fewer than 30 percent of New Year’s resolutions are kept! Most goal setting experts believe this is due to ignorance concerning how to set goals properly. So what can you do to minimize your chances of failure and maximize your chances of success to achieve your resolutions for 2010?

Continue reading "Goal Setting for the Procrastinator" »

December 01, 2008

We Each Have 24/Seven

By Dick Pexton

When I was in high school, I often rode the city bus to and from school before I was old enough to drive. I frequently observed a man riding the same bus. The moment he sat down, he opened a book and began to read. This man, Richard L. Evans, was the announcer of a nationally syndicated radio program. He wrote and delivered a brief, two-minute thought each week. While two minutes may seem to be an insignificant amount of time, he delivered over 2,000 of these messages before his unexpected death in 1971.

Continue reading "We Each Have 24/Seven" »

August 05, 2008

Inaction: The Primary Reason for Failure

Why do people fail to reach their goals? They usually have a vision and know what they want. They often put together a plan. But then they still don’t get where they want to be. Why?

Most of the time, it’s because they don’t take action. They fail to execute their plan.

Goals are important. A plan is essential. But without action, all the goal-setting and planning is a waste of time.

So think about it. If you haven’t yet reached your goals, could it be because you’re still milling around on the starting line?

June 10, 2008

Are you for it or against it?

I saw this quote recently and thought it was worth sharing. Remember, you can't move forward by opposition. You move forward by being positive and taking action.

"Nothing is produced, no progress is made, by being against or criticizing something. Progress, including personal success, results from being for something and doing something about it."
Ben Miller (d. 2003)
Business executive

April 18, 2008

14 Great Ways to Stay Motivated

Ever feel like you’re swimming upstream? Try these…


14 Great Ways to Stay Motivated

By Jordan Taylor


One of the most challenging aspects of real estate investing is staying motivated in the face of adversity. Sure, it’s easy to keep going when things are going great, but what about when you can’t find deals, or when the deals you find are falling through, or when your friends and family are telling you you’re crazy to think you can do this? Because staying motivated is often easier said than done, we put together a list of 14 things you can do to lift yourself up when circumstances start dragging you down.

Continue reading "14 Great Ways to Stay Motivated" »

February 03, 2008

Wise advice from Louann’s dad: Take action

Here I go again, getting and sharing advice from the comics.

More than a year ago, I wrote about a Baldo comic strip that was quite profound in its message. Read that post.


A recent Louann comic strip had a different, but equally important message. Louann’s brother Brad goes to his father for advice. He says, “I wanna ask Toni out. But I’d be crushed if she said no and terrified if she said yes. So I’m like, paralyzed.”

Dad’s reply is: “Hm. Well, I’ve found that ‘crushed’ and ‘terrified’ pass, but paralyzed goes on and on.”

If you are not taking action because you don’t know what will happen if you do, your situation will never change. Don’t be paralyzed by fear. The only way to achieve your goals is to do something.


January 14, 2008

Don’t focus so hard on success that you fail to enjoy it

I recently saw this quote by Logan Pearsall Smith: “There are two things to aim at in life; first to get what you want, and after that to enjoy it. Only the wisest of mankind has achieved the second.”

We talk a lot about goal-setting, planning, and implementing the plan so that you can reach your goals. It’s a good idea to remember that your plan should include a defined way that you will enjoy the fruits of your labors.

Jackie

January 01, 2008

Happy Holidays – Now What?

Happy Holidays – Now What?

The holidays are over, the New Year is here.
What are you going to do now?

By Jacquelyn Lynn

You’ve probably already made your New Year’s resolutions and maybe even broken a few by now. Resolutions are a wonderful tradition, but a more effective approach is to set goals and put together a plan for reaching them.
Goal-setting is a great way to articulate what’s important to you. If something is irrelevant or a distraction, it doesn’t belong on your goal list. Be sure your goals are your goals, not someone else’s or something you just think sounds good. You’re going to have a hard time getting motivated and doing the necessary work to achieve a goal that isn’t something you really want.

Continue reading "Happy Holidays – Now What?" »

December 27, 2007

Made any New Year's Resolutions?

It's the time of year to be thinking about our New Year's resolutions. What are you planning to do -- or do differently -- in 2008? If you're making resolutions, please share them.

Jackie

December 06, 2007

Give the gift of knowledge

As you’re shopping for your holiday gifts this year, consider a gift that will be kept and used forever: knowledge. Books, audio and video programs, training classes – all are truly gifts that keep on giving and will always be treasured.

Got someone on your list who is interested in investing in real estate or stocks? Wealth Intelligence Academy training makes a wonderful gift. Or the Millionaire Real Estate Mindset is an affordable book full of advice on how to create and manage wealth. For a business owner or manager, The Entrepreneur’s Almanac is a book they’ll refer to regularly for years to come.

The gift of knowledge is one that will increase in value and be appreciated forever.

November 19, 2007

A great approach to life

I saw a quote recently I wanted to share with you. Cotton Fitzsimmons, head coach of the Phoenix Suns, said, “You’re not going to make me have a bad day. If there’s oxygen on earth and I’m breathing, it’s going to be a good day.”

What a great attitude!

Jackie

April 06, 2007

Make your ambitions your own

I’ve mentioned before that I like to read the newspaper comics—mostly for the humor but occasionally for the wisdom. In today’s “Hi & Lois” strip, son Chip says to Hi, “My ambition is to be a millionaire by the time I’m 25.” Hi answers, “Be realistic, Chip … I’m over 25 and I’m not a millionaire.” The next panel shows Chip walking away, saying, “It’s not my fault you’re not ambitious.”

Don’t measure your own ambitions by the performance of anyone else. There is nothing wrong with not wanting to be wealthy—but nor is there anything wrong with a desire for riches. You may love and admire people who have not reached the goals you have set for yourself, and that’s fine. Just don’t let the fact that they have chosen a different path stop you from achieving your dreams.

You love and admire people for who they are and you set your goals based on what you want. I have dear friends who are missionaries; they live a life far more modest than I choose, but that doesn’t stop our mutual affection (nor does it stop me from contributing to the funding their work).

So make your ambitions your own and let others take ownership of their goals and circumstances.

Jackie

Make your ambitions your own

I’ve mentioned before that I like to read the newspaper comics—mostly for the humor but occasionally for the wisdom. In today’s “Hi & Lois” strip, son Chip says to Hi, “My ambition is to be a millionaire by the time I’m 25.” Hi answers, “Be realistic, Chip … I’m over 25 and I’m not a millionaire.” The next panel shows Chip walking away, saying, “It’s not my fault you’re not ambitious.”

Don’t measure your own ambitions by the performance of anyone else. There is nothing wrong with not wanting to be wealthy—but nor is there anything wrong with a desire for riches. You may love and admire people who have not reached the goals you have set for yourself, and that’s fine. Just don’t let the fact that they have chosen a different path stop you from achieving your dreams.

You love and admire people for who they are and you set your goals based on what you want. I have dear friends who are missionaries; they live a life far more modest than I choose, but that doesn’t stop our mutual affection (nor does it stop me from contributing to the funding their work).

So make your ambitions your own and let others take ownership of their goals and circumstances.

Jackie

December 04, 2006

Are you a candidate for the Hall of Fame?

Have you changed your life for the better with real estate investing? If so, you may be eligible for the Wealth Intelligence Academy International Hall of Fame.

To be considered, go to www.wiacademy.com/superconference, click on the Hall of Fame link, scroll down to the bottom of that page for a link to the Hall of Fame questionnaire. Follow the directions for completing and submitting the questionnaire.

Hope to see you in February at the Super Conference in Orlando.

Jackie

November 20, 2006

Baldo comic strip reveals the importance of financial independence

I confess: I love the comics in the newspaper. Most of the time, I simply enjoy the humor, but occasionally a strip actually contains a serious message. The Baldo strip that was published Sunday, Nov. 19, was quite profound.

Baldo is a teenage boy who has a part-time job in an auto parts store. In this strip, he and a co-worker are leaving the store. In the first frame, Baldo says, “have you noticed? We come to work and two weeks later we get a paycheck.” In the second frame, he says, “But it seems we never get ahead. It’s work, work, work …” and in the third frame, he continues, “Then spend, spend, spend.” The fourth frame shows Baldo observing, “It’s like a vicious cycle that repeats over and over and over.” Then Baldo and his friend are shown walking down the street. Finally, the last frame repeats the first.

The message here is far more important than two teenage boys who spend the money they earn from the part-time jobs. This is the lifestyle of millions of people who go to work, get paid, spend all their money (and then some), and repeat the cycle every week. They never build any financial security or independence for themselves and their families, and they’re teaching their children the exact same lifestyle.

The good news is that the cycle can be broken. You can get off the work-spend-work-spend treadmill. Yes, it takes knowledge, commitment, and work, but if you’re going to be working anyway, why not be working for yourself and your future?

Jackie
Chief Blogger
Wealth Intelligence Academy

October 26, 2006

Trump and Kiyosaki want you to be rich

Why would two men who are already wealthy care whether or not you have any financial security of your own? Because they are concerned about the future of our country and they care about people. And in addition to being incredibly savvy businessmen and investors, they are also fundamentally teachers.

Jordan Taylor has written an excellent review of Why We Want You to be Rich: Two Men, One Message by Donald J. Trump and Robert T. Kiyosaki (with Meredith McIver and Sharon Lechter). Click here to read it.

This book belongs in your personal library—but be sure to read it, don’t just buy it and put it on the shelf. It’s available online at Amazon.com or in all fine bookstores.

Jackie
Chief Blogger
Wealth Intelligence Academy